Leigh Erwin: Wine Fermentation Temperature

Cellar Craft SterlingHi everyone!

I am very excited to finally be starting some new wines! I ended up purchasing two more wine making kits: the Cellar Craft Sterling California Chardonnay and the KenRidge Classic Nebbiolo. I chose the Cellar Craft Sterling Chardonnay because I have yet to make a white wine using oak chips and I wanted the opportunity to do so. As far as the red goes, I chose the Ken Ridge Classic Nebbiolo because it is a red that did not come with the skins, nor does it use oak. It does contain a packet of dried elderberries, which I thought was a fun change-up for a wine making kit.

I decided to start with the Chardonnay first for no reason in particular. Just like all the other times, I drew off water the night before, just in case there was chlorine in there so it could dissipate. The day of fermentation, I first prepared and added the bentonite solution, then added the wine base. Then, I used about 8 cups of warm water to rinse out the bag.

At this point, I checked the specific gravity with my hydrometer as well as the temperature, which came out to 1.100 and 69oF.

Feeling satisfied with these values, I then sprinkled the yeast onto the top of the juice and loosely placed the lid on top. I decided not to place the lid on tightly or use an air lock because from what I’ve read about primary fermentations, they actually like and need to have some oxygen in order to successfully proceed through the process.

According to the instructions that came with the wine making kit, I was to leave the wine fermenting until at least day 6. So, I did just that.

On day 6, I went to check in on the specific gravity and was surprised to find it had barely moved and was at 1.080. I had forgotten to check the temperature of the wine, but I could feel in the room it was somewhat cool.

See, previously the heat was switching on regularly, as it was late winter and that’s what happens! Around the time I started the Sterling Chardonnay, however, it had actually been very warm outside, so I wasn’t using the heat at all. There were actually a couple of days where it was so hot that I needed to switch on the air conditioning, but didn’t think about the fact that the vents were open in the winery room and while I was making things nice and comfortable in the upstairs living areas, I was inadvertently making things very cold in the basement where the winery room is located.

Beginning to wonder if that had something to do with my ridiculously slow fermentation; I decided to try a couple things to get this wine making kit fermenting while simultaneously reaching out to ECKraus for advice. My next post will follow up more on that.
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Leigh Erwin Bio PictureMy name is Leigh Erwin, and I am a brand-spankin’ new home winemaker! E. C. Kraus has asked me to share with you my journey from a first-time dabbler to an accomplished home winemaker. From time to time I’ll be checking in with this blog and reporting my experience with you: the good, bad — and the ugly.

4 thoughts on “Leigh Erwin: Wine Fermentation Temperature

  1. To keep temp under control order a copper tun heating pad from Kraus, they are 39.95. It will keep the temp between 70 & 80 degrees. I have 2 and they work great. Don

  2. I live in the Philippines and do my wines in a spare bedroom Impossible for me to keep temperatures down that low. So I have opted for a Yeast that ferments well at higher temperatures. #1118.

  3. I am a first timer on the wine making. [ although I probably have spent more time wining about what I have been doing ]. Anyway, in regards to temp. My stuff is in my basement. The temp stays at 65 no matter what. So I got some carboy heaters. Now I realize that not everyone can do this? But I hooked up a light dimmer switch to the outlets that I plug the heaters into. I can then adjust the voltage level to the heaters to maintain a constant temp of 72.
    Just sharing.
    Love the site! Clint from Iowa

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