Yummy Chocolate Milk Stout Recipe (All-Grain & Partial Mash)

Chocolate Milk Stout RecipeIf you’re searching for a thick, luscious dessert beer, then look no further.

Milk stout (a.k.a. sweet stout) is a sub-style of stout noted for its creamy texture and residual sweetness. It’s not actually made with milk. Instead, many brewers choose to use unfermentable lactose sugar in order to achieve that creamy, sweet character.

This chocolate milk stout recipe starts with a basic sweet stout recipe and adds a pound of unfermentable lactose sugar to increase sweetness and body. A generous dose of chocolate malt, plus four ounces of cacoa nibs make for a big chocolate flavor that will remind you (and all your friends) of chocolate milk.

 

Chocolate Milk Stout Recipe
(5 Gallon Recipe, All-Grain & Partial Mash)

Specs
OG: 1.060
FG: 1.022
ABV: 5%
IBUs: 27
SRM: 36

Ingredients
8 lbs. 2-Row Brewer’s Malt Shop Steam Freak Kits
1 lb. Caramel 80L Malt
1 lb. Chocolate Malt
.25 lb. Roasted Barley
1 lb. Lactose Sugar
1.5 oz. Willamette hops (First Wort Hops)
.5 oz. Willamette hops at :60
1 tsp. Irish Moss at :15
Wyeast 1084: Irish Ale Yeast
4 oz. Cacao nibs (added in secondary)
5 oz. priming sugar (if bottling)

Directions for All-Grain: Prepare a 2L yeast starter. Single infusion mash at 150°F for 60 minutes. Add first wort hops when sparging into the brew kettle. Collect seven gallons of wort. Bring to a boil. Add .5 oz. of Willamette hops at beginning of 60-minute boil. Add 1 tsp. of Irish moss with 15 minutes left in the boil. At the end of the boil, mix in the lactose sugar. Chill wort and transfer to a clean, sanitized fermenter. Ferment at 68°F for seven days, then transfer to a secondary fermenter holding the cacao nibs. Ferment for ten days at 68°F. Bottle or keg as normal.

Directions for Partial Mash: Prepare a 2L yeast starter. Replace the 6 of the 8 lbs. of 2-Row malt with 4 lbs. Light DME. Mash the crushed grains with 1.5 gallons of water at 150°F for 60 minutes. Strain wort into brew kettle and rinse grains with one gallon of water at 170°F. Mix in the DME and top off with enough water to make four gallons. Add the first wort hops and bring wort to a boil. Shop Home Brew Starter KitProceed with recipe as above, topping off with enough clean, sanitized water to make five gallons in the fermenter. Primary fermentation for seven days at 68°F. Rack beer onto cacao nibs in a secondary fermenter and ferment for ten days at 68°F. Bottle or keg as normal.

 

This is a very easy chocolate milk stout recipe that make a tremendous brew. And, I can’t think of a better time to brew it up then right now! It’s very tasty after big meals making it an excellent choice to serve during the Holidays.
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.

 

5 Hard Cider Recipe Variations

Apples For Making CiderA while back we introduced an easy way to make your own hard cider and shared a very basic hard cider recipe for making 5 gallons. However, this intro only scratches the surface. In fact, there is a wide variety of augmentations you can apply to a hard cider recipe to alter its flavor.

Fruits, spices, sugars, and yeasts: here are five ways to add some variation to your homemade hard cider recipe – and make yours stand out from the pack!

 

  1. Fruit
    As with beer, fruit can be added to any hard cider recipe for extra complexity, flavor, and sweetness. Peaches, raspberries, figs, strawberries, blueberries, watermelons… it’s all fair game! Crushed fruit is usually added to the fermenter. You can add crushed whole fruit or you can experiment with fruit flavoring. Some cider makers prefer to use frozen fruit. The freezing breaks down the fruit’s cell walls, making it easier to extract more flavor. When dealing with whole fruit, Shop FerMonsterconsider using some pectic enzyme to help break down haze-forming pectins.
  1. Spices
    Try adding whole spices to your hard cider recipe. Add cinnamon, ginger, and clove to the secondary fermenter. Alternatively, heat the spices in a mixture of honey or simply syrup and mix into the apple juice prior to or after primary fermentation. Remember, go easy the first time you add spices to your cider. You can always add more to your next batch. If you do accidentally add too much, just let the cider age until the spices mellow out.
  1. Sugars 
    A wide variety of sugars can be used to boost the gravity of your hard cider, from cane sugar or household brown sugar to Belgian candi sugar or honey. I recently tasted a cider back-sweetened with a brandy reduction. It was amazing!
  1. Yeast
    Ale yeasts like Fermentis Safale S-04 are clean fermenters – they don’t leave behind much in the way of yeasty esters or phenolics as long as they ferment within the recommended temperature range. You could however experiment with different yeast strains to try to bring out some yeast character. Farmhouse and Belgian beer yeasts are worth trying on an apple cider recipe, Shop Beer Flavoringsnot to mention a whole slew of wine yeasts. How would a hefeweizen yeast turn out, fermented at lower temperatures to accentuate the clove character? Could be interesting…
  1. Mix and Match 
    Once you’ve tried a few of these different hard cider recipe variations listed above, why not combine some of them? To play it safe (and if you have the spare fermentation capacity) try one variation at a time, then blend them together later on after you’ve had a chance to try each one. You may discover your new favorite drink!

 

What variations have you tried with your homemade hard cider?
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.

Maple Scotch Ale Recipe (Partial Mash & All-Grain)

Beer Made With This Maple Scotch Ale RecipeIf you like Scotch ales, then here’s a Scotch ale recipe that you will love! It’s a classic brew with an eclectic, maple twist that will have you reaching for another.

There are few flavors that are as unique and delicious as maple syrup. Whether it was pancakes, waffles, or French toast, you probably grew up with maple syrup along with your favorite Sunday breakfast. Lucky for you, maple syrup can also be used in your homebrew!

The high fermentability and unique flavor of maple syrup make it work well with a number of beer styles, especially those that feature malt flavors. A maple brown ale is a popular combination, but today’s beer recipe pairs it with a Scottish ale.

Scotch ales are known for being malt forward with notes of caramel. Generally, they have low IBUs, though a small amount of roasted barley may enhance the perception of bitterness. Rather than deriving caramel flavor from caramel malt, all-grain Scotch ale recipes often involve taking a portion of the first runnings from the mash and boiling them down to develop caramelization. As one might imagine, these caramel flavors work well with the maple syrup.

Some brewers recommend using grade-B maple syrup, which has a stronger maple flavor, but typical grade-A syrup you might use on your pancakes will work too. Just be sure to use all-natural, 100% maple syrup if you want to avoid putting artificial colorings, flavors, and preservatives in your brew. Due to the high sugar content of maple syrup, it will ferment out almost completely, leaving behind a hint of that sweet maple flavor. Enjoy!

 

Maple Scotch Ale Recipe
(5.5-gallon batch, partial mash)

Specs 
OG: 1.046
FG: 1.010
ABV: 4.7%
IBUs: 15.5Shop Steam Freak Kits
SRM: 12

Ingredients 
7 oz. German Munich malt
4 oz. Caramel 20L malt
2 oz. Roasted barley
3.3 lbs. light LME
2 lbs. amber DME
.5 oz. Magnum pellet hops at :60 (6.1 AAUs)
3 cups maple syrup
1 pack Mangrove Jack’s US West Coast Yeast

Partial Mash Directions: 
In a small stockpot, mash crushed grains at 156°F. in 1.25 qts. of clean, chlorine-free water for 60 minutes. Strain mash through a colander into boil kettle to remove grains, then rinse them with 1 qt. water at 170˚F, collecting runoff in the kettle. Add malt extract and enough water to make three gallons. Bring to a boil. Add Magnum hops and boil for 60 minutes. At end of boil, turn off the heat, mix in maple syrup, then whirlpool and chill wort to 60˚F or below. Pour wort into a clean, sanitized fermenter with enough cool, clean, chlorine-free water to make 5.5 gallons. Stir well to aerate. Pitch yeast and ferment at 58˚F for at least two weeks. Bottle or keg and carbonate for about 2.5 volumes CO2.

All-grain option:   Shop Home Brew Starter Kit
Replace the malt extract with 7.2 lbs. pale ale malt. Mash grains at 156˚F for one hour. Halfway through the mash, remove two gallons of wort and boil it to condense into one gallon. This will develop caramelization. Sparge to collect a total of 7 gallons of wort, including the one gallon of caramelized wort. Boil for 30 minutes, then add Magnum hops. Boil for 60 minutes and proceed with recipe above.

Do you have a favorite Scotch ale recipe you’d like to share with us. We love to see what other homebrewer’s got cookin’.

—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder of the Local Beer Blog.

5 Easy Beer Recipes for Beginners

Making Beer Recipes For BeginnersSo you’ve just started homebrewing. Congrats! Now, what should you brew? With a seemingly endless list of possible beers to brew, where do you start? What homebrewing ingredients should you get?

Here are some easy beer recipes for beginners. These are some of the best, basic homebrewing recipes:

 

  1. HefeweizenThe German-style wheat beer is often a “gateway beer” for beginning brewers. The traditional weizen yeast strain produces flavors of banana and clove. Want more clove? Keep the fermentation on the cool side. More banana? Let the fermentation temperature push to the upper end of the acceptable range, about 64-75˚F. Either way, this is a beer style that’s a great companion to warm weather, goat cheese, and citrus-flavored foods.
  1. Brown AleBrown ale can be a great middle-of-the-road homebrew to enjoy year-round. It’s a malty brew, but the hop character can Shop Steam Freak Kitsvary depending on your taste. American brown ales tend to have more hop flavor and aroma than English brown ales. Try a nut brown ale to highlight the nutty flavors of some specialty malts. Of these beer recipes for beginners, this one is my favorite.
  1. StoutStout may be the most forgiving of beer styles, due in part to the roasty malt flavors and dark color that come the use of from chocolate malt, black malt, and roasted barley. This means most stouts are easy beer recipes for beginners. These attributes can also come from dark liquid malt extract or dark dry malt extract. Depending on your tastes, you can brew a dry stout, sweet stout, imperial stout, tropical stout, or even a chocolate milk stout. Whatever you do, be sure to have some Irish stout on hand for St. Patty’s Day!
  1. KölschKölsch is a great option for the homebrewer who enjoys a lighter, more delicate beer. It’s about the closest thing to a light lager while still being an ale, featuring a clear, golden color, a respectably prominent hop flavor, and a crisp, dry finish.  When brewing a German Kölsch, just make sure you can maintain control of fermentation temperatures from about 60˚F on down to about 40˚F for an authentic character. Here’s some more tips on brewing a Kölsch.
  1. Chipotle PorterAll beginning brewers reach a point Shop Home Brew Starter Kitwhere they want to branch out and experiment. If you like spicy foods, then this beer recipe is a great option. Just take a smoked porter recipe kit and add a small can of rinsed chipotle peppers to the boil. If the beer turns out too hot, just give it some time to age.

 

If you’re still not sure what to make, on our website we have a list of some of the best basic beer recipes for beginners. They list all the homebrewing ingredients.

Do you have an easy beer recipe that would be good for first-timers? Please share it below.
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder of the Local Beer Blog.

3 Homebrew Beer Recipes You’ll Want To Brew Again!

Man Drinking Homebrew BeerAs a homebrewer, I love to experiment with a wide varieties of homebrew beer recipes: ginger beer, various SMaSH beer recipes, attempts at gluten-free beer for my girlfriend. Experimentation is a great way to learn about homebrewing ingredients and the processes, but it’s also important to make beer that is guaranteed you’ll like to drink. If all you do is experiment all the time, chances are that you’ll have to stomach your way through some very.…interesting beers.

There are thousands upon thousands of homebrew beer recipes that you could make: clone recipes, SMaSH recipes, extract recipes, all-grain recipes, IPA’s, double IPA’s, dark beers, light beers, hard recipes, recipes for beginners. It is truly and endless list. With all the chatter it’s hard to choose.

With that in mind, here are three homebrew beer recipes that I would recommend for the regular rotation.

 

Homebrew Beer Recipe #1
AMARILLO PALE ALE 

(five-gallon batch, extract partial mash recipe)

This recipe produces a solid American pale ale. Malted wheat and carapils give this beer some body and a solid white head, while the Amarillo hops give it a bright citrus character.

Specs
OG: 1.059
FG: 1.016
ABV: 5.5%
IBUs: 31
SRM: 6

Ingredients
1 lb. Carapils malt
1 lb. White wheat maltShop Steam Freak Kits
6.6 lbs. Light Malt Extract
4 oz. light brown sugar (late addition)
1 oz. Amarillo hops at 60 mins (8.6 AAUs)
.5 oz. Amarillo hops at 20 mins (4.3 AAUs)
1 tsp. Irish moss at 15 mins
.5 oz. Amarillo hops at 5 mins (4.3 AAUs)
Wyeast 1056: American Ale Yeast or Fermentis Safale US-05

Directions
If using liquid yeast, prepare a yeast starter the day before brewing. On brew day, steep crushed grains in three quarts of water at 152˚F for 60 minutes. Strain out grains and rinse with hot water at 170˚F. Add liquid malt extract and enough water to make three gallons of wort and bring to a boil. Add hops and Irish moss according to schedule above. At end of boil, mix in brown sugar. Chill wort to 70˚F or below and mix in enough cool, clean water to make 5 gallons. Pitch yeast and ferment at 65-70˚F. Bottle or force carbonate for ~2.5 vols CO2.

 

Homebrew Beer Recipe #2
BIG MIKE’S BIG BROWN ALE

(five-gallon batch, all-grain recipe)

This beer recipe makes a fairly stout American brown ale with a heavy dose of hops.

Specs
OG: 1.062
FG: 1.017
ABV: 5.8%
IBUs: 62
SRM: 30

Ingredients
9.5 lbs. Two-row brewer’s maltShop Home Brew Starter Kit
1.5 lbs. Caramel 60L malt
.75 lbs. Chocolate malt
.5 lb. Belgian aromatic malt
1.5 oz. Kent Goldings hops at 60 mins (7.5 AAUs)
1 oz. Willamette hops at 30 mins (4.5 AAUs)
1 tsp. Irish moss at 15 mins
1.5 oz. Kent Goldings hops at 10 mins (7.5 AAUs)
1 oz. Willamette hops at flameout (4.5 AAUs)
Fermentis Safale US-05 Ale Yeast

Directions
Mash crushed grains at 152˚F for 60 minutes. Sparge to collect seven gallons of wort in the brew kettle. Bring to a boil and add hops according to schedule. Chill wort to 70˚F or below and ferment at 65-70˚F. Bottle or force carbonate for ~2.4 vols CO2.

 

Homebrew Beer Recipe #3
SUMMER SAISON

(five-gallon batch, all-grain recipe)

When temperatures start to rise, it’s time for saison. Not only can the saison yeast handle the higher temps, the citrus flavor and dry finish on this beer are very refreshing. This is a wonderful homebrew beer recipe that I’d wish every brewer would try.

Specs
OG: 1.061
FG: 1.012
ABV: 6.4%
IBUs: 31
SRM: 6

Ingredients
8 lbs. Two-row brewer’s malt
1 lb. Caramel 20L malt
4 oz. Flaked oats
1.5 lbs. cane sugar (late addition)
.5 oz. Northern Brewer hops at 60 mins (3.9 AAUs)
.5 oz. Kent Goldings hops at :30 (2.5 AAUs)
3 grams fresh ground coriander at :20
.5 oz. Kent Goldings hops at :15 (2.5 AAUs)shop_brew_kettles
1 tsp. Irish moss at :15
3 grams fresh ground coriander at :10
1 oz. Kent Goldings hops (dry hop)
Danstar Saison Yeast

Directions
Use relatively hard water for the mash. Mash grains in about 11 qts. of clean water at 148-150˚F for 60 minutes. Sparge to collect 7 gallons in the brew kettle. Bring to a boil. Add hops, spices, and Irish moss according to schedule. At end of boil, mix in cane sugar. Chill wort to 70˚F and transfer to fermenter. Pitch yeast and ferment at 70-75˚F. Dry hop for five days at 68˚F. Bottle or force carbonate for ~2.4 vols CO2.

These are a few of my favorite go-to homebrew beer recipes that I brew on a regular basis. Which beer styles are part of your regular rotation? Feel free to share the recipe in the comments below!
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.

Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale Clone Recipe (Extract & All-Grain)

Brooklyn Brewery Summer AleA classic summer seasonal beer is the Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale. At 4.8% ABV and 26 IBUs, it’s a lighter ale that will pair well with burgers, outdoor activities, warm sun, and good friends.

 

Grain Bill 
Harkening back to its English heritage, this clone recipe uses Crisp’s Best Ale Malt as the base. A smaller amount of pilsner malt keeps the color and flavor light. A mid-range mash temperature of 152˚F results in a good balance of body and fermentability. If brewing the partial mash version of this recipe, add the LME at the end of the boil to increase hops utilization and reduce the likelihood of the LME contributing too much color to the beer.

 

Hopping 
Cascade and Amarillo hops bring a signature American hop profile to this beer. Cascades contribute the classic citrus and spice, while Amarillo dry hops bring a pleasing tropical citrus aroma.

 

Yeast 
For yeast, Nottingham dry yeast is recommended. It’s a classic English strain with a fairly neutral flavor profile. No yeast starter is necessary for this clone recipe, but you may wish to rehydrate the yeast before pitching.

Ready to give it a try? Here’s an all-grain Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale recipe, with a partial mash recipe below! Happy brewing!

 

Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale Clone Recipe (All-Grain)
(5-gallon batch, all-grain) 

Specs
OG: 1.044
FG: 1.007
ABV: 4.8%
IBU: 26
SRM: 5

Ingredients 
6 lb. 5 oz. Crip’s Best Ale Malt
2 lb. 11 oz. Pilsner malt
.75 oz. Cascade hops at 60 mins (3.8 AAUs)
.75 oz. Cascade hops at 30 mins (3.8 AAUs)
.75 oz. Cascade hops at flameout (3.8 AAUs)
.88 oz. Amarillo hops (dry hop)
1 pack Nottingham ale yeast

All-Grain Directions
Shop Steam Freak KitsMash crushed grains in about 2.8 gallons of water at 122˚F for 30 minutes. Raise temperature to 152˚F and mash for one hour. Lauter and sparge to collect about six gallons of wort in the boil kettle. Boil for an hour, adding hops according to schedule. Chill wort and transfer to a clean, sanitized fermenter. Pitch yeast and ferment at 68˚F. Dry hop with Amarillo hops in the secondary fermenter. Bottle or keg with a target carbonation of 2.6 vols CO2.

 

Brooklyn Brewery Summer Ale Clone Recipe (Extract)
(5-gallon batch)

Specs 
OG: 1.044
FG: 1.007
ABV: 4.8%
IBU: 26
SRM: 5

Ingredients 
1 lb. 5 oz. Crip’s Best Ale Malt
11 oz. Pilsner malt
1 lb. 10 oz. light dried malt extract
3 lbs. light liquid malt extract (late boil addition)
.75 oz. Cascade hops at 60 mins (3.8 AAUs)
.75 oz. Cascade hops at 30 mins (3.8 AAUs)
.75 oz. Cascade hops at flameout (3.8 AAUs)
.88 oz. Amarillo hops (dry hop)
1 pack Nottingham ale yeastShop FerMonster

Extract Directions
Mash crushed grains in a small stockpot in about 3 quarts of water for 45 minutes. Strain wort through a colander or strainer into your brew kettle, then rinse grains with about 1.5 quarts of water at 170˚F. Add 2 gallons of water and start to heat. Once the wort is hot (but not boiling), remove the kettle from the heat to stir in your dried malt extract. Bring wort to a boil and boil for 60 minutes. Add hops according to schedule above. Five minutes before the end of the boil, stir in the liquid malt extract. Transfer wort to a clean, sanitized fermenter and top up with clean water to make five gallons. Aerate, pitch yeast, and ferment at 68˚F. Dry hop with Amarillo hops in the secondary fermenter. Bottle or keg with a target carbonation of 2.6 vols CO2.
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.

Torpedo Extra IPA Clone Recipe (All-Grain & Extract)

Seirra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA CloneIf you’re a fan of India Pale Ales, you’ve probably had Torpedo Extra IPA from Sierra Nevada. At 7.2% ABV and 65 IBUs, it’s a fairly aggressive IPA that showcases American ingredients.

When searching for a Torpedo Extra IPA clone recipe, I stumbled upon this thread on HomeBrewTalk.com. The original poster contacted Sierra Nevada and got some details on the beer recipe. (If there’s ever a beer you’d like to clone, many commercial brewers are willing to help you out!)

 

Grain Bill

The grain bill is straightforward with about 90% American two-row malt as the base. Caramel 60L malt provides some malty sweetness to support the hops and some color. A small amount of Carapils malt will contribute some body. The grains should be mashed around 155-156˚F, which will help make for a full-bodied brew. Err on the lower side for good fermentability.

 

Hopping

Sierra Nevada’s Torpedo features three types of American hops: Magnum, Citra, and Crystal. Magnum provides most of the bitterness, while Citra and Crystal join in for flavor and aroma additions.

The key to producing a Torpedo Extra IPA clone recipe is the dry hops. Torpedo is named for a dry-hopping technique developed by Sierra Nevada in which beer is circulated through a “Hop Torpedo,” sometimes called a hopback or Randall. There are many ways to build your own hop torpedo, but for best results you should have a pump to force the beer through the torpedo. If you want to forgo the hop torpedo, traditional dry hopping procedures will work fine.

 

YeastShop Steam Freak Kits

As for yeast, a standard American ale yeast will do the trick. In fact, Wyeast 1056 and Safale US-05 are often referred to as the “Chico” strain. They’re reportedly the same yeast used by Sierra Nevada in their American ales. If using liquid yeast, I recommend preparing a two-liter yeast starter from two packets of yeast to have enough yeast cells to do the job.

Ready to give it a try? Here’s an all-grain recipe, with an extract option below! Good luck!

 

Torpedo Extra IPA Clone Recipe (All-Grain)
(5.5-gallon batch)

**recipe assumes a mash efficiency of ~70%

Specs
OG: 1.073
FG: 1.018
ABV: 7.2%
IBUs: 65
SRM: 10

Ingredients
14 lbs. American two-row malt
1 lb. Caramel 60L malt
.5 lb. Carapils malt
.75 oz. Magnum hops at :75 (11 AAUs)
.5 oz. Magnum hops at :30 (7.3 AAUs)
.5 oz. Magnum hops at :5 (7.3 AAUs)
1 oz. Crystal hops at :5 (4.3 AAUs)
.5 oz. Crystal hops dry hopped for 7-10 days
.25 oz. Citra hops dry hopped for 7-10 days
.25 oz. Magnum hops dry hopped for 7-10 days
2 packets Wyeast 1056: American Ale Yeast or 1 packet Safale US-05

 

Directions:Shop Home Brew Starter Kit
Mash the crushed grains in about five gallons of clean water at 156˚F for 60 minutes. Sparge to collect 7.5 gallons of wort. Boil for 90 minutes, adding hops according to schedule above. Whirlpool, chill wort, and transfer to a clean, sanitized fermenter. Pitch yeast at 70˚F or below. Ferment at 65-70˚F. Add dry hops to the secondary fermenter and allow to sit for 7-10 days. Bottle or keg for ~2.3 vols CO2.

 

Extract Option: Replace the 14 lbs. of two-row malt with 8.4 lbs. light DME. Steep the specialty grains for 30 minutes in clean water at 156˚F. Add half the DME and enough water to make a three-gallon boil. Proceed with the recipe above, adding enough clean, chlorine-free water to the fermenter to make five gallons.

Do you have a Torpedo Extra IPA clone recipe you’d like to share? We’d love to see it. Just post it in the comments below.
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.

Anchor Steam Clone Recipe (All-Grain & Extract)

Anchor Steam Beer In Fritz Maytags HandHere’s an Anchor Steam clone recipe for both all-grain and extract brewing. This is a fun one to make and will please the palates of most beer drinkers.

First brewed in 1896, San Francisco’s Anchor Steam defined the style known as California Common. It’s an interesting cross between a pale ale and an amber lager, offering the best of both worlds: toasty malt flavor with a touch of caramel malt, balanced by firm hop bitterness, flavor, and aroma. Probably the most unique characteristic of Anchor Steam: it’s fermented at ale temperatures using a lager yeast.

Because “steam” beer is trademarked by Anchor Brewing, everyone else calls the style California Common. However, you will still hear the style referred to as “steam beer”. Why steam beer?

“Anchor Steam Beer derives its unusual name from the 19th century
when “steam” was a nickname for beer brewed on the West Coast of
America under primitive conditions and without ice. While the origin
of the name remains shrouded in mystery, it likely relates to the
original practice of fermenting the beer on San Francisco’s rooftops
in a cool climate. In lieu of ice, the foggy night air naturally cooled the
fermenting beer, creating steam off the warm open pans.”

So, Anchor Steam is actually open fermented. I wouldn’t recommend trying open fermentation at home, but if you’re feeling adventurous, go for it! You might need to build your own open fermenter. Shop FerMonster

For the rest of us, our regular carboys and fermenters will work just fine. One last characteristic to keep in mind for an Anchor Steam clone recipe: this beer uses only Northern Brewer hops.

Ready to brew? Let’s do it! Check out the all-grain and extract recipes below.

 

Anchor Steam Clone Recipe (All-Grain)
(5 Gallon Batch)

Specs
OG: 1.050
FG: 1.012
IBUs: 33-36
ABV: 4.9%
SRM: 10-11

Ingredients
7.75 lbs. Briess 2 Row Brewer’s Malt
1 lb. Caramel 40L Malt
1 lb. Victory Malt
.4 oz. Northern Brewer hops at :60 (3.1 AAUs)
1 oz. Northern Brewer hops at :15 (7.8 AAUs)
.4 oz. Northern Brewer hops at :0 (3.1 AAUs)
1 tsp. Irish Moss at :15
Wyeast 2112: California Lager Yeast
5 oz. corn sugar for priming

Shop Homebrew Starter KitDirections: Prepare a 4L yeast starter. Single infusion mash at 150F, using 1.5 qts water per pound of grain. Sparge to collect 7 gallons of wort. 60-minute boil. Chill wort, pitch yeast starter, and ferment at 60-65F for one week, then transfer to secondary for two weeks. Bottle with priming sugar and condition for two weeks.

 

Anchor Steam Clone Recipe (Extract)
(5 Gallon Batch)

Specs
OG: 1.050
FG: 1.012
IBUs: 33-36
ABV: 4.9%
SRM: 10-11

Ingredients
4 lbs. Light Dried Malt Extract
1.5 lb. Briess 2-Row Brewer’s Malt
1 lb. Victory Malt
1 lb. Caramel 40L Malt
Shop Steam Freak Kits.5 oz. Northern Brewer hops at :60 (4.7 AAUs)
1.25 oz. Northern Brewer hops at :15 (10.1 AAUs)
.5 oz. Northern Brewer hops at :0 (4.7 AAUs)
1 tsp. Irish Moss at :15
Wyeast 2112: California Lager Yeast
5 oz. corn sugar for priming

Directions: Prepare a 4L yeast starter. Mash the crushed grains in 5 quarts water. Hold temperature at 150F for one hour. Strain wort into brew kettle and sparge grains with one gallon of water at 170F. Add malt extract and bring boil volume to 3.5 gallons. 60-minute boil. Add hops according to schedule. Chill wort, pitch yeast starter, and ferment at 60-65F for one week, then transfer to secondary for two weeks. Bottle with priming sugar and condition for two weeks.

Have you ever brewed an Anchor Steam clone recipe? Did you use all-grain or extract? How did it go? Share in the comments below!
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.

Developing A Clone Beer Recipe

Man Developing A Clone Beer RecipeSome may get into homebrewing for the “do it yourself” challenge, some may start homebrewing to simply have fresh beer around the house, but others may take the step because they’ve fallen in love with a commercial beer and thought: “I could make this.”

I know – I’m one of them.

Peruse through this website or others and you’re bound to come across dozens – if not hundreds – of recipe kits at your disposal, from coffee stouts to hoppy IPAs and everything in between. But what may pique the interest of many is the ability to make “clone” beers using ingredient kits of such iconic brands as New Belgium’s Fat Tire or Samuel Smith’s Taddy Porter.

But why clone beer? It’s a good way to put your skills to the test. With that said, here’s my perspective on developing a clone beer recipe.

 

Developing a clone beer recipe to learn

Using prepared clone beer kits can be a good experiment in the homebrewing process, as you have a “control beer” to test your skills. Sometimes subtle differences in mash temperature, hop utilization, and grain bill can impact the final product. By making a beer and testing it side-by-side with the commercial version, you can get a better idea of what works best during your brew day and what you may need to pay more attention to.

I once made a Bass Pale Ale clone beer kit for the sheer challenge of trying to replicate one of the most famous versions of the style. While it ended up about 1 percent higher in alcohol content than I had hoped, it taught me to pay more attention to temperatures and how I was using my grains. It was a valuable lesson for future brew days.Shop Steam Freak Kits

If you want to clone beers yourself, the key to success is to hone your palate. As you build clone beer recipes, you’ll want to know what kind of ingredients to buy and how each piece impacts the larger puzzle.

One popular way both commercial brewers and homebrewers alike accomplish this is by brewing experimental beers, like single hop pale ales and IPAs as well as SMaSH beer recipes, which stands for “Single Malt and Single Hop.” In both cases, the goal is to hone the use of a specific ingredient so you can better understand it. Breweries like Mikkeller, Flying Dog, and even Sam Adams have produced single-hop beers as a means for consumers to taste the subtle differences between two different hop varieties, like Citra and Sorachi Ace, for example.

 

Develop a clone beer recipe to replicate your favorites

One of the first cloned beer recipes I made was a watermelon wheat beer based off of 21st Amendment’s famous Hell or High Watermelon Wheat. Sipping the California brewery’s fruit-laced beer from the can, I thought I might like to try this beer, but with more intense watermelon taste.

To make my own personal take on the clone beer, I looked up a clone recipe. Instead of using natural flavoring, I wanted to go for the real thing, so I sanitized two watermelons, cut them up and squeezed juice from them to add to my secondary. The result: a beer that tasted quite like a boozy watermelon. Unique, for sure.

One of the best parts of homebrewing beer is the ability to experiment, and cloning gives you the perfect opportunity to do just that. We all have different palates, and the aromas and tastes we experience may be better served with a tweak or two of our favorite commercial beers.Shop Conical Fermenter

No matter why you choose to develop a clone beer recipe, it’s one more tool in your toolbox (or is it bottle in your six-pack?) to help you become a better homebrewer. If you’re ready to take the plunge, check out “North American Clone Brews,” which offers 150 clone beer recipes for brewing beers from Anchor, Sierra Nevada, Fat Tire, Samuel Adams and more. Each of the clone beer recipes come with an extract, partial mash and all-grain version for homebrewers of any skill set.
—–
Bryan Roth is a beer nerd and homebrewer living in Durham, North Carolina. You can read his thoughts on beer and the beer industry on his blog, This Is Why I’m Drunk, and send him suggestions on how to get his wife to drink craft beer via Twitter at @bryandroth.

Pliny the Elder Clone Beer Recipe (All-Grain & Extract)

Pliny The Elder BeerPliny the Elder is a Double IPA and one of the top five most highly rated beers on Beer Advocate. It’s brewed by Russian River Brewing Company in Santa Rosa, CA, and is named for the Roman scholar who reportedly gave hops their original botanical name way back in the first century AD. With enough IBUs to tear the enamel off your teeth, Pliny the Elder is extremely popular and can be hard to find – why not brew your own?

This Pliny the Elder clone beer recipe comes from the book Brewing Classic Styles by Jamil Zainasheff and John Palmer. Vinnie Cilurzo, co-owner and brewmaster at Russian River, contributed to the beer recipe specifically for the book, so you can be sure it’s close to the real thing!

The clone beer recipe below assumes a mash efficiency of 83% and a 90-minute boil time. It also uses nearly seven ounces of dry hops, so if needed, review our Quick Guide to Dry Hopping Your Homebrew. Good luck!

 

“Hop Hammer” – Pliny the Elder Clone Beer Recipe
(6-gallon batch, all-grain version)

Specs
OG: 1.080
FG: 1.013
ABV: 8.9%
IBU: 100+
SRM: 6

Ingredients
Shop Steam Freak Kits15.25 lbs. American two-row malt
0.5 lb. Wheat malt
1.5 lb. Corn sugar
0.5 lb. Crystal 40L malt
2 oz. Warrior hops at 90 mins (30 AAU)
2 oz. Chinook hops at 90 mins (26 AAU)
1 oz. Simcoe hops at 45 mins (12 AAU)
1 oz. Columbus hops at 30 mins (14 AAU)
2.25 oz. Centennial hops at 0 mins (20.25 AAU)
1 oz. Simcoe hops at 0 mins (12 AAU)
3.25 oz. Columbus hops, dry hop for 7-10 days (45.5 AAU)
1.75 oz. Centennial hops, dry hop for 7-10 days (15.75 AAU)
1.75 oz. Simcoe hops, dry hop for 7-10 days (21 AAU)

Wyeast 1056: American Ale Yeast or Fermentis Safale US-05

Shop Home Brew Starter KitDirections: The day before brewing the Pliny the Elder clone beer recipe, prepare a yeast starter sufficient for an OG of 1.080. On brew day, mash the crushed grains at 150˚F in approximately 5 gallons of water. Lauter and sparge to collect 7.75 gallons of wort. Bring to a boil. Add hops according to schedule. Mix in corn sugar just before flameout. Ferment at 67˚F, slowly raising the temperature to 70˚F towards the end of primary fermentation. When most of the yeast has settled, transfer to a secondary fermenter and add the dry hops. Dry hop for 7-10 days. Bottle or keg for 2-2.5 vols CO2 of carbonation.

EXTRACT VERSION: Replace the two-row and wheat malt with 10.9 lbs. of light LME and 0.5 lb. of wheat LME. Steep the crushed caramel malt for about 30 minutes at 150˚F before mixing in the malt extracts and proceed with the beer recipe.
—–
David Ackley is a beer writer, brewer, and self-described “craft beer crusader.” He holds a General Certificate in Brewing from the Institute of Brewing and Distilling and is founder and editor of the Local Beer Blog.